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So Vivid You Can’t Get Free of Them

August 22, 2014 | by

Ray_Bradbury

Ray Bradbury

Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.
—Ray Bradbury, the Art of Fiction No. 203, 2010

Ray Bradbury would be ninety-four today—for more on his Art of Fiction interview, be sure to read “Fact-checking Ray Bradbury,” by our own Stephen Andrew Hiltner. And for proof of Bradbury’s metaphorical gifts, check out “All Summer in a Day,” a 1954 story published in the commonsensically named The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. It’s conceptually unforgettable and, among the stories of his I’ve read, uniquely haunting.

“All Summer” takes place in a school on Venus, or rather, the Venus of the future—humans have colonized the planet. Problem is, Venus is rainy. All the time. “A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again.” The sun shines for only two hours (consecutive, fortunately) every seven years. And in this drenched Venusian schoolhouse, where all the descendants of the rocket men and women presumably suffer from constant Seasonal Affective Disorder and severe vitamin D deficiencies, there’s one girl, Margot, who remembers the glories of sunshine:

The biggest crime of all was that she had come here only five years ago from Earth, and she remembered the sun and the way the sun was and the sky was when she was four in Ohio. And they, they had been on Venus all their lives, and they had been only two years old when last the sun came out and had long since forgotten the color and heat of it and the way it really was.

Today, it so happens, is the day the sun will come out, and Margot is looking forward to it more than anyone. But when the teacher’s out, her classmates lock her in a closet, and as the rain begins to cease they forget all about her:

It was as if, in the midst of a film concerning an avalanche, a tornado, a hurricane, a volcanic eruption, something had, first, gone wrong with the sound apparatus, thus muffling and finally cutting off all noise, all of the blasts and repercussions and thunders, and then, second, ripped the film from the projector and inserted in its place a beautiful tropical slide which did not move or tremor. The world ground to a standstill. The silence was so immense and unbelievable that you felt your ears had been stuffed or you had lost your hearing altogether. The children put their hands to their ears. They stood apart. The door slid back and the smell of the silent, waiting world came in to them. The sun came out. It was the color of flaming bronze and it was very large. And the sky around it was a blazing blue tile color. And the jungle burned with sunlight as the children, released from their spell, rushed out, yelling into the springtime.

Margot isn’t among them, of course, and only later, after the rain has started again, do her ebullient classmates remember that they’ve trapped her in the closet. They let her out: the end.

As a parable about senseless cruelty, it sticks in the mind whether the mind wants it there or not. Junot Díaz referenced “All Summer” in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao: “Sucks a lot to be left out of adolescence, sort of like getting locked in the closet on Venus when the sun appears for the first time in 100 years.” (You could argue that it influenced R. Kelly, too, though you’d have your work cut out for you.)

3 COMMENTS

2 Comments

  1. Mack Hall, HSG | August 23, 2014 at 10:06 am

    Thank you. I was honored to meet (as part of a large group; no credit to me) Ray Bradbury after he gave a speech. There is a photograph of the moment – me, grinning like a big goof, and Ray Bradbury, recognizing me, with a look of mixed exasperation and patience, as yet another goof with whom he posed for a snapshot on public occasions.

    Life is good.

  2. jon Lowe | December 20, 2014 at 6:23 pm

    He was a great man. I know this personally. As a young writer, when I wrote to him, and included one of my stories, he answered with encouragement. Then he answered again. And, years later, again. How many iconic authors today would take the time to do this on personal stationery?

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