The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Voltaire’

Darling, Come Back, and Other News

February 14, 2014 | by

Taiwan_Alisan_Train

Photo: Jnlin, via Wikimedia Commons

  • In Taiwan, a commemorative Valentine’s Day train ticket sold out in less than an hour: it takes you from “Dalin (大林, pronounced similarly to ‘darling’ in English) station in Chiayi County to Gueilai (歸來, literally: ‘come back’).” A journey any of us should be willing to make after we’ve behaved badly. It’s love on a real train.
  • Voltaire in love: “She understands Newton, she despises superstition and in short she makes me happy.”
  • But we can count on literature to remind us that things are not always so sweet. Here are the ten unhappiest marriages in fiction.
  • Can atrocity be the subject matter of poetry? Our poetry editor, Robyn Creswell, on Carolyn Forché’s new anthology.
  • “I also like to catch dangling modifiers, because we all miss those … I have had authors who say that dangling modifiers are part of their style and don’t want to change them.” An interview with a crackerjack copyeditor.

 

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Here Is Hemingway Getting Married, and Other News

June 26, 2013 | by

hemingwayweddingpic

  • Flavorwire has outdone itself with this slideshow of authors’ wedding pictures. (Yup: that’s Hemingway and Hadley.)
  • R.I.P. Nook—we hardly knew ya. (Which is, I suppose, the problem.)
  • Reports of Leonard Cohen’s death, on the other hand, are greatly exaggerated.
  • Beginning tomorrow, the Royal Shakespeare Company will begin tweeting out playwright Mark Ravenhill’s version of Candide. If this is the best of possible worlds, what, then, are the others?
  • At Bookish, an exclusive peek into a day in the life of editor Amy Einhorn.
  • Jane Austen may (or may not) replace Charles Darwin on the £10 note. She is, says Bank of England governor Sir Mervyn King, “quietly waiting in the wings,” presumably for a spectacular, 42nd Street–style star turn that delights creationists the world over!

 

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Discarded Books, Fake Names, and Other News

June 19, 2013 | by

discardbooks

  • In “Expired,” photographer Kerry Mansfield works with discarded books, to eerie effect.
  • How Orwell, Voltaire, and Ann Landers chose their pen names.
  • Meet Simon Vance, the name (or voice!) in audiobooks.
  • Stephen King published Joyland with lofty, print-only intentions. But of course, it is now a pirated e-book.
  • In non-news, Barbara Taylor Bradford is less than impressed by Fifty Shades of Grey.
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    A Stowaway to the Thanatosphere: My Voyage Beyond Apollo with Norman Mailer

    December 31, 2012 | by

    We’re out this week, but we’re re-posting some of our favorite pieces from 2012 while we’re away. We hope you enjoy—and have a happy New Year!

    On a brisk December day in 1972, the SS Statendam left New York Harbor with an extraordinary passenger list. Theoretical physicists, science fiction writers, a handful of paying passengers, a reporter from the New York Times, media personalities, and a couple of distinguished literary figures, including Norman Mailer. All were aboard for the ship’s destination, Cape Canaveral, to observe Apollo 17, the last manned rocket launch to the moon.

    As the skyline receded in the distance, two individuals in black leather jackets and boots tried discreetly to mingle with the other passengers on deck. Eschewing the one thousand dollar passage and without the freebies extended to celebrity guests and credited media, they had simply strolled on board at the last minute. Once the ship cast off they became—in the legal parlance of the sea—stowaways. Stowaways with a mission to rescue Norman Mailer from the clutches of a diabolical cabal of elite space imperialists.

    Advance media hype surrounding the Voyage Beyond Apollo, as it was billed, promised stellar seminars, expert panel discussions, and learned presentations by marquee names, including former astronaut Capt. Edgar Mitchell, top NASA rocketeer Wernher von Braun, sci-fi hero Arthur C. Clarke, and Mailer, whose 1970 book, Of a Fire on the Moon, qualified him as an expert on space travel. Read More »

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