The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘The Great Gatsby’

Patron Saint of Inveighing Against Stuff, and Other News

March 24, 2015 | by

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Pray to G. K. Chesterton.

  • Congratulations to Akhil Sharma, whose novel Family Life has won the Folio Prize. Writing the book, Sharma said, was “like chewing stones”: “I’m glad the book exists, I just wish I hadn’t been the guy who wrote it.”
  • “The traditional complaint about teenagers—that they treat the place like a hotel—has no purchase on me. In fact, I quite like the idea. A hotel is a place where you can come and go autonomously and with dignity; a place where you will not be subjected to criticism, blame or guilt; a place where you can drop your towel on the floor without fear of reprisal, but where, hopefully, over time, you become aware of the person whose job it is to pick it up and instead leave it folded neatly on a chair.” Rachel Cusk on raising teenagers.
  • The Great Gatsby­ was published in 1925 to lukewarm reviews and sluggish sales—how did it become a classic? Salute (or blame) the GIs: “As a part of a revolutionary scheme of donating more than 22 million books to World War II troops abroad, a publisher threw in a random book from its backlist: The Great GatsbyGatsby and others entered the consciousness of millions of men who returned from war with an appreciation for paperback books and reading.”
  • A group of Catholics have proposed G. K. Chesterton for sainthood. “Chesterton, in his jolly way, was a militant. A blaster of the superstitions of modernity, a toppler of the idols of materialism. He inveighed ceaselessly, at great length, and without ever once repeating himself, against ‘the thought-destroying forces of our time’: pessimism and determinism and pragmatism and impressionism.”
  • A brief history of gayness on television: “By the fall of 1974, three years after the first gay cameo on popular American television (the vehicle was the liberal lodestar All in the Family), there were a handful of gay characters on prime time … ‘All were rapists, child molesters, or murderers.’ Activists lobbied networks to stop depicting gays as criminals and, within a few years, moved on to more subtle forms of otherness.”

Peace Reigns Throughout the Land, and Other News

January 16, 2014 | by

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Stained glass window, Denis and Saint Sebastian Church, Kruft, Germany. Photo: Reinhardhauke, Wikimedia Commons.

*persistent, intractable religious hostilities notwithstanding

 

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20/20

August 15, 2013 | by

This Chart of Famous Eyewear is amazing—I think even those of you with perfect eyesight will agree—and the literary world is well-represented by the frames of, respectively, Hunter S. Thompson, Harry Potter, and Dolores Haze. But whither the greatest literary glasses of all time, the all-seeing specs of Dr. T. J. Eckleburg???

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Zoom in fullscreen

 

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Austen Ousts Darwin, and Other News

July 26, 2013 | by

Jane Austen banknote

  • Jane Austen is indeed replacing Darwin on the £10 note.
  • Margaret Atwood has written an opera, fifteen years in development, about the poet Pauline Johnson.
  • The letters of Roald Dahl, spanning most of his life, will be published in 2016.
  • This map, a “chapter-by-chapter breakdown of the comings and goings of characters in the The Great Gatsby,” is lovely.
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    The Great Gatsby—With a Unicorn

    May 28, 2013 | by

    Oliver Miller writes for Thought Catalog and is the author of Drinking and Driving.

     

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    How to Talk to Lady Writers, and Other News

    May 20, 2013 | by

    May or may not be competent needlewoman.

    May or may not be competent needle-woman.

  • “A large number of literary females are excellent needle-women, and good housewives.” Etiquette for dealing with the authoress, from 1854.
  • You might see the headline “5 Books with Awful Original Titles” and think, Oh, how bad can they be? And then you read the list.
  • George R. R. Martin enjoyed the new Gatsby. In case you were wondering.
  • Meanwhile, Joyce Carol Oates takes to Twitter to discuss the experience of media. “If you are a writer, only writing really engages your concentration & excitement—even reading is a relatively passive activity.”
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