The Paris Review Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Tonight: Join Us for an AWP Happy Hour

February 27, 2014 | by

AWP table

Continuing last week’s westerly trend, our digital director, Justin Alvarez, and our associate editor, Stephen Hiltner, have descended upon Seattle for the AWP Conference. (I’ve never been to Seattle, so I won’t even try to set the scene for you. Insert clichéd quip here—about the Space Needle, Starbucks, the grunge scene, flannel, Microsoft, rain, Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, etc.) If you’re around, be sure to stop by table N18, where Justin and Stephen will be all weekend with discounted subscription deals, tote bags, selected back issues from our archives, endless charm, easy smiles, and more.

Oh, almost forgot: booze. There are few things writers and publishers enjoy more than drinking on the cheap; we know this. Thus, from six to eight this evening, The Paris Review is co-hosting a happy hour at Linda’s Tavern with A Strange Object, Electric Literature, and Guernica. Stop by for first-rate hobnobbing and, yes, alcohol.

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Your Likeness in Cheese, and Other News

January 28, 2014 | by

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Vincenzo Campi, The Ricotta Eaters, 1580. Via Wikimedia Commons.

  • Gift idea: cheese portraits. The medium is the message here—this cheese is made with bacteria cultivated from your mouth or toes. It’s you, indubitably, microbially. The artist adds, “The bacteria that you find in-between the toes is actually very similar to the bacteria that makes cheese smell like toes.” You don’t say.
  • Amazon has purchased another block of Seattle. A technofortress, no doubt, soon to be swarming with drones.
  • The Sims is the bestselling PC game of all time. It also has—no mean feat—the most poetic, surreal software-update notifications of all time. “Sims will no longer walk on water to view paintings placed on swimming pool walls.”
  • Presenting the Daphne, an award for the best book to have been published fifty years ago.
  • Melville the prognosticator: Moby-Dick, Benito Cereno, and modern-day imperialism.

 

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Heartless Thief Steals Books on Bikes Bicycle, and Other News

August 19, 2013 | by

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  • Shocking, shocking: a Seattle thief has stolen the Books on Bikes librarian’s bicycle. Thankfully, the trailer of books was not attached.
  • “Sixty percent of the thirty-six books recommended for four-to-eight-year-olds feature animals, or are in other ways concerned with nature. For the nine-to-twelve age group, it’s just over fifty percent.” Why are children’s books so preoccupied with fauna?
  • Casual sex: a great way to get book recommendations!
  • By contrast: an interview with the author of the best-selling The Art of Sleeping Alone: Why One French Woman Gave Up Sex. (This is, obviously, the English title; French people are presumably less obsessed with French women than are anglophones.)
  • Behold: the trailer for C.O.G., adapted from David Sedaris’s Naked
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    No Books Were Harmed

    June 17, 2013 | by

    Herewith: the Seattle Public Library sets a 2,131-book domino-chain world record.

     

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    The Knight’s Tale, and Other News

    June 12, 2013 | by

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    Hear That Lonesome Gasket Blow: Part 1

    December 11, 2012 | by

    In the aisle of the Boeing 737 sardine tin, a wild-eyed, whiskered man—late twenties—held up the smooth flow of Seattle-bound passengers with frantic attempts to stow his carry-on. The impedimenta in question seemed to yours truly a destination-appropriate one: secured to his bulging backpack with yards of duct tape, a skateboard jutted. As he stooped to unwrap the thing, provoking more than a few pursed lips from the jammed queue, he bickered with the flight attendant.

    “Can’t I just keep it in my lap?”

    “If you can’t fit it in the overhead compartment, you’ll have to check it plane-side.”

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