The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Pablo Neruda’

Murder! Intrigue! Book Clubs! And Other News

June 4, 2013 | by

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  • “Illustrator Jonathan Wolstenholme is a fine artist living in London who depicts still lifes [that] feature animated books with arms engaged in humorous scenarios.” Tee-hee
  • Pulitzer-winning novelist Adam Johnson interviews Kim Jong-il’s sushi chef.
  • The prime suspect in Pablo Neruda’s possible murder is an American double agent in witness protection (!!!).
  • Today, Melville House releases James Agee’s “Cotton Tenants: Three Families” in book form.
  • How to spot the homicidal maniac in your book club.
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    The Digital Public Library, and Other News

    April 9, 2013 | by

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    Built of Books, and Other News

    March 8, 2013 | by

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  • Dutch artist Frank Halmans makes book houses, in a series called Built of Books.
  • Pablo Neruda is going to be exhumed. Why? “Manuel Araya, who was Neruda’s chauffer during the sick writer’s last few months, says agents of the dictatorship took advantage of his ailment to inject poison into his stomach while he was bedridden at the Santa Maria clinic in Santiago.” Stand by.
  • Simon Akam: “I hate Bridezillas for one simple reason: bride does not rhyme with god. Ergo, Bridezillas is not a functioning pun.”
  • The Vatican Library, or Bibliotheca Apostolica, is planning to digitize its eighty-nine thousand holdings.
  • In more accessible reading, a tribute to NYC bookstores.
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    The Maurice Sendak School, and Other News

    February 13, 2013 | by

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  • Pablo Neruda’s body will be exhumed in search for answers to his suspicious death, in 1973. Was he poisoned by the Pinochet regime? As he said, forgetting is so long.
  • U.S. and U.K.: two nations separated by slightly different cover art aesthetics. Which do you prefer? 
  • Three buyers are vying for Raleigh’s Quail Ridge Books; all three contenders are apparently local. 
  • Brooklyn’s PS 118 will henceforth be known as the Maurice Sendak Community School
  • We were going to share with you the Craigslist posting for an attractive copy editor, but it has been flagged for removal
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    1984, and Other News

    January 8, 2013 | by

  • Check out the new 1984 cover. What do you think?
  • The Thomas Pynchon rumors: a breakdown.
  • How should Shakespeare really sound?
  • New Yorkers are spending more time in libraries … but not to read.
  • Love it or leave it, this is our world: Neruda Cats.
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    Our Twilight Lands

    March 26, 2012 | by

    Argentinian journalist Leila Guerriero wrote this article, translated by Sarah Foster, based on her interview with Chilean poet Nicanor Parra at his home on the coast of Chile. It was published in the Spanish newspaper El País after Parra was awarded the Cervantes Prize last December. The prize, given by Spain’s Ministry of Culture, is the most prestigious literary award in the Spanish-speaking world. Parra’s poem “Defense of Violeta Parra” appeared in our two-hundredth issue, on newsstands now.

    Reaching the house where Nicanor Parra lives, on Lincoln Street in Las Cruces, a coastal town two hundred kilometers from Santiago de Chile, is easy. The hard part is reaching him.

    Nicanor Parra Oiundo de San Fabian de Alico is the first-born son out of a total of eight children brought into the world by Nicanor Parra, a high school teacher, and Clara Sandoval. He was born in 1914, was twenty-five during World War II, sixty-six when John Lennon was shot, and eighty-seven when the planes hit the towers. Last September, he turned ninety-seven. Some people don’t even know he’s still alive.

    Las Cruces is a town with two thousand inhabitants, shielded from the Pacific Ocean by a bay that embraces several towns: Cartagena, El Tabo. Parra’s house is on a cliff, overlooking the sea. In the garden, a staircase comes down to the front door, where local punks have painted graffiti so that no one will dare touch the house; it says, “Antipoetry.” In the foyer, he has written the names and telephone numbers of his children.

    Nicanor Parra’s hair is white. He has a long beard and no wrinkles, only furrows in a face that seems to be made of earth. His hands are tanned, no spots or creases, like two roots rinsed in water. Lying on a table is the second volume of his complete works, Obras completas y algo (1975–2006). In its preface, Harold Bloom writes, “I firmly believe that, if the most powerful poet produced by the New World until now is still Walt Whitman, Parra joins him as an essential poet in our Twilight Lands.” At the end of the eighties, when Parra was still living in Santiago, he stopped giving interviews, and, although there have always been exceptions, he often objects to direct questions in unexpected ways, so that a conversation with him is subject to uncertain diversions, into topics that he repeats and brings up for whatever reason: his grandchildren, the Laws of Manu, the Tao Te Ching, Neruda. Read More »

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