The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Oscar Wilde’

The (Microscopic) Tracks of My Tears, and Other News

May 13, 2014 | by


Tears of grief, photo © Rose-Lynn Fisher, courtesy of the artist and Craig Krull Gallery, Santa Monica, CA; image via Smithsonian Magazine

  • Up for auction: an edition of The Importance of Being Earnest, warmly inscribed by one Oscar Wilde himself to Major James Nelson, the prison governor who permitted Wilde access to books during his stint at Reading Gaol in May 1895. “A trivial recognition of a great and noble kindness,” the inscription reads.
  • All this month, New York’s Elizabeth Street Garden celebrates the life and work of Robert Walser. “Much of his work and philosophies rest on the quiet magic and personal fulfillment of walking; the urban experience is full of such walks, and this is often how people discover Elizabeth Street Garden.”
  • Was Andrew Wyeth so celebrated because he was so misunderstood, or did it work the other way around? His reputation seems ill-fitting, whether you consider him one of the great American painters of the last century, as many laymen and a few professionals do, or a kitsch monger and conman, as many more professionals and a few sniffy, wised-up laymen do.”
  • In a new project called “Topography of Tears,” the photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher puts dried human tears under the microscope. She collected more than one hundred tears: tears of joy, tears of grief, onion tears, basal tears …
  • Many of our nation’s ice-cream trucks—though not, fortunately, Mister Softee—are blaring a jingle based on one of the most racist songs in American history.



Celebrating Alain Resnais, and Other News

March 3, 2014 | by

Screen shot 2014-03-02 at 5.03.52 PM

A still from a 1961 interview with Alain Resnais.



Opulence of Twaddle, Penury of Sense, and Other News

February 19, 2014 | by


Bierce in 1892, barely containing his rage. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.



Book Smart

October 16, 2013 | by


“If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.” ―Oscar Wilde



Area Man Returns Book After Discovering Wilde Gay, and Other News

June 27, 2013 | by


  • The Tweet pictured above really speaks for itself.
  • And another one down: Chicago’s oldest used bookstore, the eccentric and beloved O’Gara and Wilson Antiquarian Booksellers, is closing its venerable Hyde Park location. But all is not lost: the shop is relocating to a more affordable location in Indiana.
  • Here are mashups of chick lit and Marvel comics, because we live in a world unrecognizable to our great-grandparents.
  • Speaking of! Subtle changes (degredation or evolution, you choose!) to the English language, happening as we speak.
  • The Atlantic asks: Must every new coming-of-age novel be “the next Catcher in the Rye?” (Yes.)


    Cult Classic: Defining Katherine Mansfield

    March 18, 2013 | by

    katherineIn “Je Ne Parle Pas Français,” a short story by Katherine Mansfield, the narrator muses: “I believe that people are like portmanteaux—packed with certain things, started going, thrown about, tossed away, dumped down, lost and found, half emptied suddenly, or squeezed fatter than ever, until finally the Ultimate Porter swings them on to the Ultimate Train and away they rattle …”

    Mansfield’s own Train has proved to be less Ultimate than she may have hoped. Despite sharp instructions to her husband to publish as little as possible after her death, the enterprising John Middleton Murry quickly set about curating her legacy. He perceptively noted (with, one imagines, a gleeful rubbing of hands), “Since Katherine Mansfield’s death, the interest in her personality has steadily increased.” It was, he explained, his duty to make known her private correspondence, the stories she was unsatisfied with, the journals in which she had recorded her thoughts.

    It has been a lively afterlife. In the ninety years since Mansfield’s death, her work has never been out of print; the same stories repeatedly reedited and reissued in newer, more “authentic” editions. Biographies have multiplied, clamoring for validation like conspiracy theorists. Scholars have greedily rummaged through this particular portmanteau, each emerging with quite irreconcilable portraits of the author. Read More »