The Paris Review Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Kindle’

This Month’s Most Expensive E-Books

January 29, 2014 | by

Screen shot 2014-01-29 at 4.26.23 PM

If you’re flush, you could spend your days schlepping from to one rare-book room to another, hoping to stumble upon a first edition that’s both a worthy investment and an aesthetic treasure. Or you could just go to Amazon and buy one of these recently published e-books, which will, given their pedigree and initial cost, most certainly appreciate in value.

  • River Flow 2012 ($114.98) (“covers issues such as river hydrodynamics, morphodynamics, and sediment transport”)
  • The Perils of Gertrude: 1st Peril Special Edition ($199.00)
  • TRANSHUMAN: (Screenplay) ($200.00)
  • Moroccan Math Secrets (French Edition) ($200.00)
  • The Amazon’s Most Expensive Book (Arabic Edition) ($200.00)

    (“This book is one of the most expensive available on Amazon in Kindle version. It does not exist on paper version. It caters to the richest people. Those who can buy it without flinching. It is not for the poor, stingy, or for those who count their money. Therefore, please do not buy this book if you do not have enough money on your bank account. If you are not wealthy but think you can read this book and ask for a refund afterwards, give up immediately, you are not the readership target. Any unusual thing is expensive! This is the law of supply and demand. Only a privileged few can buy and read this book. The others: go your way. Many free books are available for your long winter evenings. However, if you have a lot of money, and if the price of this book does not disturb you more than that, welcome and good reading.”)

  • Miscellaneous Thoughts, Volume I ($200.00)
  • Quay Walls, Second Edition ($247.96)
  • Proceedings of 2013 4th International Asia Conference on Industrial Engineering and Management Innovation ($319.20)
  • Ullmann’s Fine Chemicals ($347.60)
  •  

    3 COMMENTS

    Conversing with Brodsky, and Other News

    November 14, 2013 | by

    Josef_Brodskylarge

  • Amazon has launched a juggernaut of a Kindle store in Australia.
  • The Joseph Brodsky reading list for facilitating intelligent conversation.
  • Alison Bechdel on heading to Broadway.
  • Writing for good health
  •  

    NO COMMENTS

    Digital Book Signings, and Other News

    February 27, 2013 | by

    ab-Toni-Morrison

  • “Why do so many novels get adapted into screenplays at all, when their essential quality, the persuasive and enthralling power of prose, always must be stripped—and the final product is always left in some state of diminishment?” Ian Crouch on that modern institution, the miniseries. 
  • At three P.M., Toni Morrison is conducting a “digital book signing.” (Really more of a Google hangout, but still.)
  • What are the ten best books you’ve never read? (I, for one, have never finished The Ginger Man.)
  • While we’re ranking stuff: your favorite film about a writer? (Barton Fink.)
  • “Rather than limiting discussion of a certain book to a digital room in e-readers such as the Kobo or Kindle, Socialbook lets all your friends in your personal digital network know what you’re reading and invites them into the conversation. Furthermore, Socialbook puts participants right into the text of the book, where they can scribble notes in the digital margin of the book, highlight portions, pull out quotes and even rearrange the content.” To coin a phrase, “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.”
  •  

    1 COMMENT

    Beautiful Books, and Other News

    November 19, 2012 | by

  • Stationer Mr. Boddington’s Studio does a series of whimsical Penguin Classics covers.
  • Raymond Carver’s OkCupid profile, as edited by Gordon Lish.
  • “On the Kindle, each screen shot floats in space, isolated from the previous or subsequent ones, an effect that left my memory of the book weirdly nebulous.” The challenges of reviewing on the Kindle.
  • Five books on anxiety.
  • Mr. Roth hasn’t given up writing entirely. He is collaborating on a novella, via e-mail, with the 8-year-old daughter of a former girlfriend.”
  •  

    NO COMMENTS

    Bradbury’s File, The Unified Field

    August 29, 2012 | by

  • Seattle band Fleet Foxes is launching an arts and literary journal, The Unified Field. Quoth the L, “Round one features a journal entry penned by recently freed West Memphis 3 member Damien Echols on adjusting to life after eighteen years on death row, an excerpt from Gloria Steinem’s forthcoming book, a photo essay on adolescence by noted rock photographer Autumn de Wilde, a contribution from SPIN’s Charles Aaron, and another from Animal Collective sister/visual collaborator Abby Portner, among 30-plus other pieces.” Proceeds benefit nonprofit 826 National.
  • During the sixties, the FBI kept a file on suspected communist sympathizer Ray Bradbury. According to the bureau’s then-source, “some of Bradbury’s stories have been definitely slanted against the United States and its capitalistic form of governmental.”
  • Kindles don’t have a soporific effect according to one study: “a two-hour exposure to light from self-luminous electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about 22 percent … Stimulating the human circadian system to this level may affect sleep in those using the devices prior to bedtime.”
  • The Marriage Plot hits the small screen.
  • Across languages, “the fundamental colour hierarchy, at least in the early stages (black/white, red, yellow/green, blue) remains generally accepted. The problem is that no one could explain why this ordering of colour exists. Why, for example, does the blue of sky and sea, or the green of foliage, not occur as a word before the far less common red?”
  • [tweetbutton]

    [facebook_ilike]

    2 COMMENTS

    Beautiful Bookshelves, Rule Breaking, and More!

    May 3, 2012 | by

  • The Tehran International Book Fair cracks down on “harmful” titles.
  • “Poets break all the rules. When other writers take their photos outdoors, poets stay inside. They’re the only ones who wear hats or leather jackets with nothing underneath.”
  • Target will no longer be in the Kindle business. (A sentence that would have mystified our forebears.)
  • “The passive voice remains an important arrow in the rhetorical quiver. After all, it exists for a reason.”
  • A gallery of beautiful bookshelves.
  • 1 COMMENT