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Posts Tagged ‘Johnny Depp’

Hollywood Indian

August 1, 2013 | by

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Image from D. W. Griffith’s film The Squaw’s Love, 1911

At the turn of the nineteenth century into the twentieth, a young Abanaki Native American woman named Margaret “Soaring Dove” “Dark Eyes” Tahamont moved from her home in the Adirondacks across the country to Los Angeles to play in the moving pictures. She was born in Indian Lake, New York, where her extended family—a mixed group of Abanaki, Oneida, and Anglo ancestry—had been well established since the town’s founding, owning substantial land, running an inn for visitors to the region from New York City, and employing many town residents as laborers.

Margaret, born Camp, judging from all photographs of her Indian Lake family, was raised in the costume of any white northerner. Her cousin Emma, near Margaret’s age, can be seen wearing a high loose bun, plush woven hats, and carefully tailored dresses covering from the high neck to the wrist, puffed at the sleeves, pintucked across the bodice, and lightly trimmed with lace.

But Margaret moved to Los Angeles to perform as an Indian in plays, Indian hobby societies, and early silent films. She now wore long braids, leather, beaded headbands, moccasins, and performed under the name Dove Eye. Her husband Elijah Tahamont, or Dark Cloud (also Abanaki, from Quebec), had been acting in silent films made in the Adirondack region—what would later be known as the “eastern Westerns”—including at least a few with soon-to-be famed director D. W. Griffith, and when eastern production companies began to move west to join nascent Hollywood corporations, the Tahamonts went along. Elijah, as Dark Cloud, played in over thirty titles; Margaret in at least five silent shorts, and likely more—the idea of preserving film and film records still lying a bit ahead on the horizon. Read More »

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Celebrity Publishing, and Other News

May 10, 2013 | by

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  • “I waited until my first book was published to learn the genre, and when Oprah announced ‘It’s literary fiction!’ just seconds after my pub date, I was overcome with joy.” At McSweeney’s, Jessica Francis Kane tries to make the Genre Reveal Party happen. 
  • Stewart Brand, the human proto-Internet.
  • Viggo Mortensen, Johnny Depp, and 50 Cent: just three of the celebrity publishers on the scene.
  • Short fiction, annotated.
  • “Around the time we had our first home computer, my dad started to keep track of all of the books that he read in an Excel Spreadsheet. He kept his spreadsheet up to date for almost twenty years, and he’d accumulated 10,496 books before his death. My dad rated his books on a 1-10 scale, but his average score floated around 7.5/10, so I think he generally enjoyed most of what he read.” A tribute to a devoted reader.
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    Wordy Joyce, Papal Deals

    October 17, 2012 | by

  • Word portraits by artist John Sokol.
  • Thanks to a new ruling, a massive Kafka archive could soon be made public.
  • Pope Benedict has inked a book deal; no word yet on the figure.
  • Hilary Mantel has won her second Man Booker Prize for Bring Up the Bodies.
  • Obviously, Johnny Depp has his own imprint.
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    Reading Children, Posthumous Novels

    July 10, 2012 | by

  • William Faulkner’s first published work, from the 1919 New Republic.
  • Woody Guthrie’s unpublished novel will be published next year, with a little help from Johnny Depp.
  • If you’ve never seen Émile Zola’s legendary “J’Accuse!” editorial, the Los Angeles Review of Books has helpfully shared it.
  • If Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester texted.
  • The Dorothy Parker Facebook page FAQ is the ne plus ultra of dead author Fabecbook page FAQs.
  • Vintage photos of children reading.

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