The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘James Bond’

Burning Books, Listening to Just Kids, Casting Fleming

May 22, 2012 | by

  • For those with Spotify, all the songs mentioned in Just Kids, in playlist form. (Perfect for a rainy day!)
  • Duncan Jones has signed on to direct a biopic of Ian Fleming, based on Andrew Lycett’s The Man Behind James Bond. Everyone knows the man himself okayed Sean Connery to play 007, but who should fill the enigmatic writer-spy’s shoes?
  • A letter from Edgar Allan Poe to Sarah Josepha Hale, author of the poem “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” has sold at auction for $164,000. In it, Poe refuses an offer to publish in Hale’s magazine, explaining, “To send you a crude or hastily written article would be injurious to me, and an insult to yourself—and I fear that I could, at present, do little more.”
  • William Peter Blatty, better known as the author of The Exorcist, is suing Georgetown University in church court, disputing his alma mater’s right to still call themselves Catholic given some of its secular policies.
  • “Frat boys burning textbooks to celebrate graduation burn down frat house.”
  • 3 COMMENTS

    Rushdie Is Bored, Pynchon Goes Public

    May 8, 2012 | by

  • The creator of publishing tumblr Real Talk has unmasked herself! It’s GOOD magazine executive editor Ann Friedman.
  • Salman Rushdie pronounces Middlemarch boring.
  • A great what-if: Bond by Hitchcock.
  • The seven best dinner parties in literature? We say Anna Karenina was robbed!
  • Brace yourselves for Pynchon in Public Day.
  • 5 COMMENTS

    Sylvia Plath, Robot Librarians, and Lickable Wallpaper

    April 18, 2012 | by

  • How to write a best seller?
  • “If you are like me, you must always have something to read in the bathroom. Anything will do.”
  • Meet identical-twin writers.
  • Amazon to reissue James Bond.
  • “Is it taboo to write about baking and Sylvia Plath?” Paper and Salt proves that whatever else, the results can be delicious.
  • In a Roald Dahl image come to life, meet the world’s first lickable wallpaper.
  • Building a library of jokes, hoaxes, and literary frauds.
  • Libraries jump through hoops (and hire book robots) to stay alive.
  • Dwight MacDonald and the art of the essay.
  • 1 COMMENT

    A Week in Culture: Dan Chiasson, Poet

    December 1, 2010 | by

    DAY ONE

    6:15 A.M. Our children wake us up. Nobody wants anything read to them this morning. They are involved in some kind of acrimonious negotiation involving Lego heads (“That’s my head!” “It’s MY head!” “No, mine!” et cetera) so I go into the next room and start thinking about a class I am guest teaching today at BU. I’ve been reading (and writing) father-son poems, and I think, Why not just tell the students what’s on my mind: Sir Walter Raleigh’s poem for his son, “Three Things There Be.” The poem comes in several variants; I print them out and look at a brief discussion of the variants as well as the provocative “spoiled riddle” poems (poems that act like riddles but give their solutions away) on Slate, by Robert Pinsky.

    I go to the Times website, and there is (fortuitously) this article on metaphor and the brain. I skim it for something I can say to the class. Neuroscience is very keen on poets and poetry these days: It turns out that when you call someone a cockroach, you activate the same part of your brain that can recall the picture of an actual cockroach

    8:30 A.M. I head into Boston. It’s an hour drive this time of day. I get a four-shot latte at Karma Coffee, Route 20 in Sudbury (do yourself a favor). I am listening a lot to the Byrds’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo these days, especially “One Hundred Years from Now.” I have a problem that technology has solved. When I like a song, I listen to it over and over for weeks at a time. You used to have to keep rewinding the tape, and the tape would snap or come unraveled. Now, with iPods, it’s no problem.

    Read More »

    8 COMMENTS