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Posts Tagged ‘Haruki Murakami’

Searching for Haruki Murakami’s Old Jazz Club, and Other News

February 11, 2014 | by

peter cat jazz

Photo: oldworldwisdom, via tumblr

  • The Iowa Writers’ Workshop: brought to you by the CIA. (Also herewith: Frank Conroy’s derisive pronouncements on everyone from Melville to Pynchon. “Of David Foster Wallace he growled, with a wave of his hand, ‘He has his thing that he does.’”)
  • Haruki Murakami had a jazz club. It closed in 1981. What you’ll find there today: “A drab three-story cement building. Outside … a restaurant had set up a sampuru display of plastic foods. Above it, an orange banner advertised DINING CAFE.” Jazz!
  • Tracking the fluctuating sales of Library of America classics: “Who would have thought that Ben Stiller’s movie remake of The Secret Life of Walter Mitty would triple sales of the LOA’s James Thurber edition. Or that the film version of On the Road would increase sales of the Kerouac volume that contains the novel by more than thirty percent?”
  • While we’re on Kerouac: a German college student took all the locations from On the Road and plugged them into Google Maps. The resulting driving directions—On the Road for 17,527 Miles—are available for free. My personal favorite part is “Take exit 362 to merge onto I-180 N/Interstate 25 Business/US-85 N/US 87 Business toward Central Ave.”
  • A must for your reference shelf: every Prince hairstyle from 1978 to 2013, in one easy-to-read (and purple, of course) chart.

 

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Fitzgerald’s Bookkeeping, and Other News

April 30, 2013 | by

460x

  • “This is a record of everything Fitzgerald wrote, and what he did with it, in his own hand.” The University of South Carolina makes F. Scott’s financial ledger available on the Internet. (“Just weeks before the opening of the movie The Great Gatsby,” the AP adds, horribly.)
  • In news that carries the ring of inevitability, Steven Soderbergh is writing a crime novella on Twitter.
  • “It’s pretty graphic, and it’s pretty pornographic for seventh-grade boys and girls to be reading,” says one concerned mother, about … Anne Frank’s diary.
  • Haruki Murakami is set to make his first public appearance in Japan since 1995.
  • A. A. Milne’s WWI propaganda career comes to light.
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    Fitness for Writers, and Other News

    March 6, 2013 | by

    ByHeart_MohsinHamid

  • “Writing a long novel is like survival training. Physical strength is as necessary as artistic sensitivity.” Mohsin Hamid’s fitness tips for writers.
  • The Vida results are in, and they are, as per usual, damning.
  • “I was bored at work and looking for a distraction.” Maris Kreizman on the birth of Slaughterhouse 90210.
  • It is World Read Aloud Day, should you have a child handy! (An adult will do too.)
  • Why it’s needed? #FictionalCharactersIWantToMarry is a thing. (Reuven Malter, not that you asked.)
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    Bookless Libraries, and Other News

    January 14, 2013 | by

  • Meet the bookless library, if you dare.
  • If that fills you with fear, here is a beautiful antique barn filled with books.
  • A Murakami calendar? There is indeed an app for that.
  • A tribute to Aaron Swartz.
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    John Jeremiah Sullivan Answers Your Questions

    August 31, 2012 | by

    This week, our Southern editor, John Jeremiah Sullivan, stepped in to address your queries.

    Dear Paris Review,

    I live in the deep south and was raised in a religious cult.

    Still with me?

    Okay. I’m attempting to throw off the shackles of my religious upbringing and become an intelligent well-informed adult. My primary source of rebellion thus far has been movies. I would watch a Fellini movie and then feel suddenly superior to my friends and family because they only watched movies in their native tongue (trust me I know how pathetic this is). My main question involves my reading selections. Obviously, I have stumbled upon your publication and am aware of its status as the primary literary periodical in English. Also, I have a brand-new subscription to the New York Review of Books, since it is apparently the intellectual center of the English-speaking universe. I am not in an M.F.A. program or living in Brooklyn working on the Great American Kindle Single, I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. This brings me to my question: What books should I read? There are so many books out there worth reading, that I literally don’t know where to start. To give you some background info: I was not raised as a reader and was not taught any literature in the Christian high school that I attended. What kinds of books do I like? My answer to that would be movies. I’m desperate to start some kind of grand reading plan that will educate me about the world but don’t know where to start. The classics? Which ones? Modern stuff? Should I alternate one classic with one recent book? How much should I read fiction? How much should I read nonfiction? I went to college but it was for nursing, so I have never been taught anything about reading by anybody.

    I realize this stuff may be outside of your comfort zone, as most of the advice questions seem to be from aspiring writers or college-educated people. Please believe me when I say that I am out of touch with the modern world because of a very specific religious cult. I want to be an educated, well-read, cultured, critically thinking person but need some stuff to read. Before I end this letter, I’ll provide an example of just how out of touch I am: you know how "Ms." is the non-sexist way to refer to a woman, and that "Mrs." is sexist? Yeah, I just found out about that. I’m twenty-five.

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    The Beet Goes On, Chicken Soup for Soul and Stomach

    August 27, 2012 | by

  • Perhaps inevitably, Chicken Soup for the Soul is launching a line of seven soups, “led by iconic chicken noodle, made with tender chunks of chicken, egg noodles, and vegetables in a signature broth.”
  • In their annual Nobel Prize run-up, Ladbrokes favors Haruki Murakami at 7 to 1 odds.
  • The Shakespeare Insult Generator.
  • Ian McEwan: “Whenever I see the word beetroot it looks so appealing. The word looks its colour, so I’m going to have that.”
  • “One of Mr. Rutherford’s clients, who confidently commissioned hundreds of reviews and didn’t even require them to be favorable, subsequently became a best seller.” The business of raves

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