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Posts Tagged ‘Harper Lee’

Pork Products in the Work of Harper Lee

March 7, 2014 | by

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Detail from George Morland’s Vor dem Schweinestall, 1793.

Yesterday, the estimable Margaret Eby sent me something she had run across in The Artists’ and Writers’ Cookbook, a 1961 oddity fiercely beloved by culinary bibliophiles. This book—which featured an introduction by Alice B. Toklas and illustrations by Marcel Duchamp—is a treasure trove of literary arcana, containing as it does entries from contributors as wide-ranging as Man Ray, George Sand, and John Keats. (Maria Popova did a terrific post on TAAWC, if you want to see more.)

One of the more contemporary offerings, and that which Margaret passed along, is Harper Lee’s recipe for cracklin’ cornbread. It reads as follows: Read More »

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The High School Literature Zodiac

November 27, 2013 | by

What does your favorite book from high school tell you about your life?

 

Tim Taranto hails from Upstate New York and attended Cornell. In addition to The Paris Review Daily, his work has appeared on the Rumpus and McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Tim lives in Iowa City, where he is studying fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

 

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Harper Lee Versus the Museum, and Other News

September 23, 2013 | by

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  • Fresh on the heels of her recent settlement, eighty-seven-year-old Harper Lee is now at loggerheads with the Monroe County Heritage Museum in her hometown of Monroeville. The small museum is largely devoted to To Kill a Mockingbird; Lee is seeking a trademark for the words when used on clothing and souvenirs. The museum, for its part, contends that these sales are vital to its continued operation.
  • “The only thing I ever walked out of was Dr. Doolittle with Eddie Murphy … It’s remarkable what I’ll sit through—it really is.” David Sedaris talks movies.
  • “Few writers in any genre, fiction or nonfiction, have described the workings of white-collar crime with such clarity and precision.” An appreciation of John D. MacDonald
  • Speaking of: Gerald Kersh, “a prolific, strange, and compelling writer who avoided any taint of respectability.”
  • Just in time for Banned Books Week, North Carolina County has voted to ban Invisible Man.
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    Dr. Who Poetry, and Other News

    September 9, 2013 | by

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  • “We’re trying to reorder some of the myths based on the documents.” Bolaño’s unpublished work, on view in Spain.
  • Harper Lee and agent Samuel Pinkus have apparenty reached an “agreement in principle” to settle the eighty-seven-year-old author’s copyright lawsuit.
  • While he might have objected to their dissemination, here are twenty-two out-of-print J. D. Salinger stories that you can read online.
  • A crowd-funded Dr. Who poetry book? Oh, it’s happening.
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    Fun with Word Frequency, and Other News

    May 8, 2013 | by

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  • See how many times a word or phrase is used in a book! Hours of … okay, maybe not fun, but hours.
  • New research suggests that there exists a family of “ultraconserved words”—including ashes, man, worm, and not—that have survived, virtually unchanged, for fifteen thousand years.
  • Amanda Knox tells the Times what she reads. Among others: Marilynne Robinson, Vladimir Nabokov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Jonathan Safran Foer, and David Foster Wallace.
  • The Harper Lee copyright fracas inspires a list of literary lawsuits.
  • “I’ve been getting death threats.” Charlaine Harris on the end of Sookie Stackhouse.
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    Wild and Crazy Libraries, and Other News

    May 7, 2013 | by

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    • “It is definitely not your mother’s Donnell,” says the New York Times, ominously, of the new plans for the Fifty-Third Street branch of the New York Public Library.
    • Famously reclusive eighty-seven-year-old national treasure Harper Lee is suing literary agent Samuel Pinkus over the copyright for To Kill a Mockingbird. Says Lee’s lawyer, “Pinkus knew that Harper Lee was an elderly woman with physical infirmities that made it difficult for her to read and see … Harper Lee had no idea she had assigned her copyright.”
    • The new Goodreads archnemesis (our word), Riffle, is live.
    • Martin Amis apparently “views the Brooklyn hipster scene as populated by conventional posers.”
    • If fictional mothers wrote hypothetical parenting books—because why not?

     

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