The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘food’

Sketches from the elBulli Kitchen

February 25, 2014 | by

10

Detail from Ferran Adrià, Plating Diagram, c. 2000-2004; Colored pen on graph paper; courtesy of elBullifoundation

6

Ferran Adrià, Theory of Culinary Evolution, 2013; crayon, paint stick, and colored pencil; sixty drawings, each 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches; courtesy of elBullifoundation

4

Albert Adrià, Ferran Adrià, and Oriol Castro, from Notebooks Related to Creativity, 1987-2011; Ink on paper; Courtesy of elBullifoundation

11

Detail from Ferran Adrià, Plating Diagram, c. 2000-2004; Colored pen on graph paper; courtesy of elBullifoundation

5

Ferran Adrià, Theory of Culinary Evolution, 2013; crayon, paint stick, and colored pencil; sixty drawings, each 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches; courtesy of elBullifoundation

3

Ferran Adrià, Creative Pyramid, 2013; ink on paper, dimensions variable; courtesy of elBullifoundation

7

Ferran Adrià, Theory of Culinary Evolution, 2013; crayon, paint stick, and colored pencil; sixty drawings, each 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches; courtesy of elBullifoundation

9

Ferran Adrià, Plating Diagram, c. 2000-2004; Colored pen on graph paper; courtesy of elBullifoundation

2

Marta Mendez, Pictograms, 2001/2013; Archival pigment print on Hannemuhle paper; fifteen prints, each 12 x 12 inches; courtesy of elBullifoundation

8

Ferran Adrià, Plating Diagram, c. 2000-2004; Colored pen on graph paper; courtesy of elBullifoundation

1

Marta Mendez, Pictograms, 2001/2013; Archival pigment print on Hannemuhle paper; fifteen prints, each 12 x 12 inches; courtesy of elBullifoundation

Ferran Adrià: Notes on Creativity, on view at the Drawing Center in New York through this week, seeks to claim the status of artist for one of the most innovative chefs working today. Adrià gained fame at the now-shuttered Spanish restaurant elBulli, where he sustained a three-star Michelin rating for fourteen years and garnered comparisons to another famous Catalan, Salvador Dali. To call a chef an artist can smack of hyperbole, but the new vanguard in contemporary cuisine, led in no small part by Adrià, is defying previous definitions of gastronomy. But despite the surge in technique—and for that matter, cost—food’s ephemeral, basic-need status inclines art purists to consider it a flash in the pan. Notes on Creativity resolves these tensions with sketches and notes that indicate the complex, restless work of Adrià’s kitchen, to say nothing of his mind.

The objects on display—ledgers, notebooks, scrap paper—illuminate the extent to which cooking is a creative process, as impassioned and compulsory as any. While he ran elBulli, Adrià kept detailed records, filling stray pieces of paper with plating ideas, loose concepts, and flavor profiles. In these ephemera we see the evolution of Adrià’s style over decades, and his determination to articulate his designs. The sketches are a window into the expanse of Adrià’s imagination, in particular the plasticity of his process. As it turns out, he is just as likely to start with a visual impression of a dish, figuring out the flavor components later, as he is to begin with an ingredient—an approach that seems like the culinary equivalent of Ginger Rogers doing Fred Astaire’s moves backward and in heels. Read More »

NO COMMENTS

All We Had

December 4, 2013 | by

71103321_89ad1bb166_z

Photo: Luigi Anzivino.

My boyfriend Keith does not like my dumplings. He thinks they’re plain-tasting. I stir the sticky dough. He says that even their color is unappetizing. Like paste, he tells me, like something thick from inside an engine.

“Like papier-mâché, almost,” he says, and I look at him and blink.

Keith and I have been standing in my cramped kitchen for over an hour now, scraping spoons against spoons, and it’s late. On the table behind us, there’s a bowl of French-cut green beans and a whole chicken, getting cold. I take a pinch of flour and release it over the bowl.

“Like this,” I say, but still the consistency won’t come together in the way I know it can. I add another pinch, and then another, and then another.

The recipe for the dish is my grandmother’s, and it is simple: whisk together flour and egg, whisk until the dough sticks to the spoon and then, at last, snaps back against the bowl. It’s all about consistency, something you can’t put your finger on, something you just have to know. That is why there is no written recipe for this dish, this congealed mess of white that gets boiled in bits and drenched in sour cream and salt and pepper. There is no written recipe because how do you put your finger on dumpling elasticity?

“So you just know?” Keith asks. He dips his finger into the simmering stock beside us, pulling it to his lips.

“I just know,” I say. Read More »

3 COMMENTS

Kimchi and Turkey

November 27, 2013 | by

kimchi

This Thanksgiving will be only the second time in thirty-six years I won’t be with my mother for the holiday. Last year was the first, when I spent it with my wife and her family. All day long I sat in her mother’s condo above the shores of Lake Erie—ice floes stretching to the horizon—and I thought about my mother, how she always labored over the turkey and dressing, deviled eggs, mashed potatoes, dumplings, corn, green beans, and three of four pies. That’s probably not that uncommon in a lot of homes across the country or in the Appalachian South where I was raised and where we like to serve two starches for every vegetable. But what is unusual is the sight of my mother, a Korean woman of five feet four inches, with beautiful salt and pepper hair, and a round face and almond-shaped eyes working away in the kitchen. Forty-three years ago she left Masan, South Korea, after marrying my father, and when she came to this country, after brief spells in Phoenix and Toledo, they settled in the hills of southeastern Kentucky. She was a vegetarian then but that was not a lifestyle decision. It was borne of necessity. Her family had never had enough money to afford beef, pork, or poultry, items considered expensive delicacies when she was a child, and her body had not learned to digest them. Rice (bop) was scarce and precious, as precious as cornmeal to my father’s family when he had been a child, and it was often the only thing she had to eat. And when there was no food at all, my halmuni still lit a fire and boiled water so that smoke would rise from their chimney and the other villagers would not know the family had nothing to eat.

Read More »

4 COMMENTS

The Snack

September 2, 2013 | by

Goldfish

I first considered the meaning of the word snack in fourth grade while reading the children’s book The Giver. The main character, Jonas, remembers elementary school, when the proper pronunciation of the word eluded him. He says “smack” instead and is punished with the literal smack of a ruler until he learns to pronounce the word correctly. The author uses Jonas’s confusion to highlight the book’s main theme: that knowledge and pain should never be tied together. 

Though the “snack” incident plays only a minor role in The Giver, it made me realize that prior to pre-school there had been no such thing as a snack. There were three meals a day that were prepared and consumed rather formally. Meals were pleasurable and nourishing and that was that. They had purpose—they knew who they were, followed a routine schedule, had a role, and happily filled their recipients. They gave context to a day and helped quell any hint of insatiable hunger, or bouts of melancholy. They maintained a steady daily course from kitchen to table to belly. They delivered. Read More »

1 COMMENT

Happy Birthday, Julia

August 16, 2013 | by

steak

“The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for the steak to cook.” —Julia Child

 

2 COMMENTS

Beckett on the Block, and Other News

July 12, 2013 | by

Smuel Beckett Murphy manuscript for sale

  • Reading University is now the proud owner of “almost certainly the most important English language manuscript still in private hands,” a six-notebook draft of Samuel Beckett’s Murphy. (The damage? A cool [almost] one million pounds.)
  • When writers eat.
  • When writers drink.
  • And speaking of comestibles: the typography picnic is a thing.
  • Whether or not you’ve heard of them (we all know what happens when you assume), these six lesser-known women writers deserve your attention.
  •  

    Comments Off