The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Ernest Hemingway’

Faulkner’s Cocktail of Choice

December 31, 2013 | by

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In honor of the new year, we are bringing you some of your favorite posts from 2013. Happy holidays!

When I first started working at Kings County Distillery, in the summer of 2010, I was delighted to find the job provided ample time to read. Whiskey making has its own peculiar rhythm. Each batch begins in a flurry, as one juggles a series of tasks like a line cook, but ends in a hush, with little to do but watch the languorous drip of the stills.

This was in the wobbly-legged days of the company’s infancy, before we moved into the grand old brick paymaster building in the Brooklyn Navy Yards. Back then we were based out of a studio space on Meadow Street with wooden floors and five-gallon steel pot stills that had to be emptied, scaldingly, by hand. (This, as our former downstairs neighbors can attest, would prove an unfortunate combination of circumstances.) During that first summer, we worked singly, in nine-hour shifts, so there was a lot of alone time. So, unless one wanted to lose one’s goddamn mind in that little room, one read. Read More »

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The High School Literature Zodiac

November 27, 2013 | by

What does your favorite book from high school tell you about your life?

 

Tim Taranto hails from Upstate New York and attended Cornell. In addition to The Paris Review Daily, his work has appeared on the Rumpus and McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Tim lives in Iowa City, where he is studying fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

 

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How the Magic Happens, and Other News

November 25, 2013 | by

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  • Begin your week with these lovely shots of the Strand Rare Book Room.
  • Cary “Westley” Elwes is, as one might expect, writing a memoir about the making of The Princess Bride.
  • “Compiling this Guardian/Observer list of one hundred great novels in the English language, and rediscovering old favourites from week to week, has become as much an autobiographical as a literary process.” How the magic (or at least the list) happens
  • “That swaggering conception of manhood now seems wholly deleterious, and even his worldliness suggests little more than a knack for talking to waiters.” Michael Gorra on Hemingway
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    Frolicking, and Other News

    October 30, 2013 | by

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    Author’s Best Friend: The Pets of Literary Greats

    October 15, 2013 | by

     

    Tim Taranto hails from Upstate New York, and attended Cornell. In addition to The Paris Review Daily, his work has appeared on the Rumpus and McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Tim lives in Iowa City, where he is studying fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

     

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    The Hemingways Hold Grudges, and Other News

    September 18, 2013 | by

     Ernest Hemingway and Patrick “Mouse” Hemingway with a Gun in Idaho. Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

    Ernest Hemingway and Patrick “Mouse” Hemingway with a Gun in Idaho. Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

    • Quoth Patrick Hemingway, “I’m not a great fan of Vanity Fair. It’s a sort of luxury thinker’s magazine, for people who get their satisfaction out of driving a Jaguar instead of a Mini.” VF rejected his dad’s story “My Life in the Bull Ring With Donald Ogden” in 1924, and apparently the Hemingways hold a grudge; although Vanity Fair reportedly wanted to publish it, the story will run in the October Harper’s.
    • “Insults from Kakutani about characters or the book or its author: 27.” Michi, by the numbers
    • NYU’s Center for French Civilization and Culture kicks off its “Re-Thinking Literature” conference tomorrow. Speakers include Ben Lerner, Wayne Koestenbaum, Joshua Cohen, and many more scholars, critics, and writers.
    • A previously unpublished poem by Dorothy Wordsworth (poet, sister, and muse of William), “Lines addressed to my kind friend & medical attendant, Thomas Carr,” is on the Oxford University Press blog. Wordsworth was, at the time, suffering from arteriosclerosis and dementia.

     

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