The Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Charles Dickens’

March Madness

March 4, 2013 | by

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“It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.” —Charles Dickens

 

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Here is a LEGO Scrooge for You

December 19, 2012 | by

A Christmas Carol was published by Chapman & Hall on December 19, 1843. So here is a version acted out by LEGOs.

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“Marley Was Dead: to Begin With.”

December 14, 2012 | by

This Saturday, December 15, join Housing Works for the third annual A Christmas Carol marathon reading. Readers include John Hodgman, Eileen Myles, David Wayne, our own dear Lorin Stein, and many other terrific people. See you there!

 

 

 

 

 

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The Dickens Museum, and Other News

December 7, 2012 | by

  • “The Dickens Museum felt for many years a bit like Miss Havisham, covered in dust.” After an extensive renovation, the London home where Charles Dickens lived as a newlywed has reopened to the public.
  • “Maintain low financial expectations.” One author reveals his earnings.
  • Capitalism and socialism were Merriam-Webster’s most looked-up words of the year. But malarkey had a strong showing, too!
  • Authors choose their favorite illustrations.
  • Oh dear: Are we in the midst of a reading crisis?
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    The Modern Monastery: Pussy Riot in Prison

    October 11, 2012 | by

    Philadelphia's Walnut Street Penitentiary

    “Prison,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova said in her interview with GQ, “is like a monastery—it’s a place for ascetic practices.” Member of the celebrated but incarcerated band Pussy Riot, Tolokonnikova gave voice to the belief that prison can be a soul-changing institution: an idea that inspired the American penal system.

    The same year that America declared its independence from Great Britain, Philadelphia’s Walnut Street Jail opened. Its first major addition came in 1790 at the instigation of Quaker reformers who proposed “a penitentiary house” of sixteen individual cells for solitary confinement.

    The penitentiary, unlike jails or prisons, set itself to the task of rehabilitating prisoners. Religious penance became the paradigm for criminal punishment; the monastic chamber served as the model for the prison cell. Walnut Street exemplified the philosophy of what became known as the Pennsylvania System, which separated prisoners from one another while enforcing silence and manual labor as mechanisms for transformation.

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    Fake Books, Fictional Detectives

    September 20, 2012 | by

  • “Would anyone go and ‘consult’ him? One feels not.” In a rediscovered Agatha Christie document, the author admits to a love-hate relationship with her creation, the debonair Belgian detective Poirot, and critiques other mystery writers.
  • The Marquis de Sade wanted even more days of Sodom? Unfinished novels of great writers.
  • “Wanting for some unknown reason to fill a space in his study with a selection of false books—complete with witty names he thought up himself—[Dickens] wrote to a bookbinder with a list of ‘imitation book-backs’ to be created specially for his bookshelf.” Now, the New York Public Library has re-created several of these fake books.
  • And speaking of the NYPL! Thanks to a donation, the library has reconsidered its controversial plan to relocate many of its books.
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