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Posts Tagged ‘Ben Lerner’

Relive the Revel

April 11, 2014 | by

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Frederick Seidel

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Ben Lerner, Emma Cline

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Ben Lerner, John Jeremiah Sullivan

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel
The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Francine du Plessix Gray, Robert Pounder

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Frederick Seidel

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Gary Shteyngart, Brandon del Pozo

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Gay Talese

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Jeffrey Eugenides, Larissa MacFarquhar

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

John Jeremiah Sullivan

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Jon-Jon Goulian

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Jonathan Galassi

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Jonathan Galassi

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Kay Eldredge, James Salter, Jeanne McCulloch, Rex Weiner

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Kedakai Turner, James Lipton

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel
The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel
The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel
The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel
The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel
The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Lorin Stein

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Roz Chast, Ben Lerner, Emma Cline, Lydia Davis

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Roz Chast

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Stephanie LaCava

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Terry McDonell

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Uma Thurman

The Paris Review 2014 Spring Revel

Zadie Smith, Frederick Seidel

We’re still recovering from Tuesday’s Revel, where some five hundred people gathered to honor Frederick Seidel with the Hadada Award, presented by John Jeremiah Sullivan. Lydia Davis presented Emma Cline with the Plimpton Prize for Fiction; Roz Chast presented the Terry Southern Prize for Humor to Ben Lerner; and Martin Amis, Zadie Smith, and Uma Thurman all read from Seidel’s work. We could say a good time was had by all, but why not let the pictures tell the tale? It was a spectacular evening. You can read accounts of the fun from Page Six, Women’s Wear Daily, and Guest of a Guest. Be sure to take a look at all the photos here, too. See you next year!

Photos by Clint Spaulding / © Patrick McMullan / PatrickMcMullan.com

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Emma Cline Wins Plimpton Prize; Ben Lerner Wins Terry Southern Prize

March 12, 2014 | by

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.16.43 AM

Photo of Emma Cline by James Williams; photo of Ben Lerner by Matt Lerner

Each year, at our annual Spring Revel, the board of The Paris Review awards two prizes for outstanding contributions to the magazine. It is with great pleasure that we announce our 2014 honorees.

The Plimpton Prize for Fiction is a $10,000 award given to a new voice from our last four issues. Named after our longtime editor George Plimpton, it commemorates his zeal for discovering new writers. This year’s Plimpton Prize will be presented by Lydia Davis to Emma Cline for her story “Marion,” from issue 205. 

The Terry Southern Prize is a $5,000 award honoring “humor, wit, and sprezzatura” in work from either The Paris Review or the Daily. This year’s prize will be presented by Roz Chast to Ben Lerner for “False Spring” (issue 205) and “Specimen Days” (issue 208). Both are excerpts from his forthcoming novel 10:04.

From all of us on staff, a heartfelt chapeau!

(And if you haven’t bought your ticket to attend the Revel—supporting the magazine and writers you love—isn’t this the time?)

 

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Presenting Our Spring Issue

March 3, 2014 | by

TPR-208Our new Spring issue is full of firsts. That fellow on the cover is Evan Connell, whose first novel, Mrs. Bridge, originated as a short story in our Fall 1955 issue.

Then there’s our interview with Matthew Weiner, the creator of Mad Men—the first Art of Screenwriting interview to feature a television writer. Weiner discusses the influence of T.S. Eliot, John Cheever, Alfred Hitchcock, and The Sopranos on his work:

Mad Men would have been some sort of crisp, soapy version of The West Wing if not for The Sopranos. Peggy would have been a climber. All the things that people thought were going to happen would have happened … The important thing, for me, was hearing the way David Chase indulged the subconscious. I learned not to question its communicative power.

And in the Art of Nonfiction No. 7, Adam Phillips grants us our first-ever interview with a psychoanalyst; he discusses not just his writing but his philosophy, and the importance of psychoanalysis:

When people say, “I’m the kind of person who,” my heart always sinks. These are formulas, we’ve all got about ten formulas about who we are, what we like, the kind of people we like, all that stuff. The disparity between these phrases and how one experiences oneself minute by minute is ludicrous. It’s like the caption under a painting. You think, Well, yeah, I can see it’s called that. But you need to look at the picture.

There’s also our first story from Zadie Smith; fiction from Ben Lerner, Luke Mogelson, and Bill Cotter; and the second installment of Rachel Cusk’s novel, Outline, with illustrations by Samantha Hahn. Plus new poems by John Ashbery, Dorothea Lasky, Carol Muske-Dukes, Geoffrey G. O’Brien, Nick Laird, and the inimitable Frederick Seidel, who will be honored with the Hadada Award next month at our Spring Revel.

And a portfolio of previously unpublished photographs by Francesca Woodman.

It all adds up to an issue sure to put a spring in your step.

Subscribe now!

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The Female Gaze

November 27, 2013 | by

Miss last night’s McNally Jackson discussion of ekphrasis between Ben Lerner, Geoff Dyer, and our favorite moderator, editor Lorin Stein? Luckily for you, Kate Gavino of Last Night’s Reading illustrated one of many quotable moments.

dyerlarge

 

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What We’re Doing

November 25, 2013 | by

mcnallylarge

New Yorkers! Tomorrow night, head to McNally Jackson Booksellers to see Geoff Dyer and Ben Lerner discuss how to write about looking (among other things). Moderated by our very own EIC, Lorin Stein.

 

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The Hemingways Hold Grudges, and Other News

September 18, 2013 | by

 Ernest Hemingway and Patrick “Mouse” Hemingway with a Gun in Idaho. Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

Ernest Hemingway and Patrick “Mouse” Hemingway with a Gun in Idaho. Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

  • Quoth Patrick Hemingway, “I’m not a great fan of Vanity Fair. It’s a sort of luxury thinker’s magazine, for people who get their satisfaction out of driving a Jaguar instead of a Mini.” VF rejected his dad’s story “My Life in the Bull Ring With Donald Ogden” in 1924, and apparently the Hemingways hold a grudge; although Vanity Fair reportedly wanted to publish it, the story will run in the October Harper’s.
  • “Insults from Kakutani about characters or the book or its author: 27.” Michi, by the numbers
  • NYU’s Center for French Civilization and Culture kicks off its “Re-Thinking Literature” conference tomorrow. Speakers include Ben Lerner, Wayne Koestenbaum, Joshua Cohen, and many more scholars, critics, and writers.
  • A previously unpublished poem by Dorothy Wordsworth (poet, sister, and muse of William), “Lines addressed to my kind friend & medical attendant, Thomas Carr,” is on the Oxford University Press blog. Wordsworth was, at the time, suffering from arteriosclerosis and dementia.

 

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