The Paris Review Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Abraham Lincoln’

Happy Birthday, Abraham Lincoln

February 12, 2013 | by

Lincoln+Reading+With+Child

“My Best Friend is a person who will give me a book I have not read.” —Abraham Lincoln

 

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The Presidency, in Verse

November 2, 2012 | by

We may know their takes on climate change, on reproductive rights, on economic policy. But what of poetry? The Poetry Foundation has investigated the poets the presidents loved, and presented their findings in an illuminating and timely post. Just a few pairings:Read More »

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Babyish Handwriting, Malarkey

October 15, 2012 | by

  • Is Spotify for books coming?
  • University of Missouri Press gets a reprieve!
  • Abraham Lincoln: the inexhaustible subject.
  • Speaking of the presidency: a guide to malarkey.
  • “A bit sad and even a little babyish”: a handwriting expert analyzes the penmanship of Lady Gaga, Barack Obama, and Prince William, among others. (Spoiler: the quote refers to the leader of the free world.)
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    Writing: The Great Invention of the World

    August 24, 2012 | by

  • “Take a pencil to write with on aeroplanes. Pens leak. But if the pencil breaks, you can’t sharpen it on the plane, because you can’t take knives with you. Therefore: take two pencils.” Margaret Atwood’s rules for writing fiction.
  • “I would like to write another book for children but I spend all my spare time just answering the letters I get from children about the books I have already written.” —E.B. White, 1961.
  • “Writing, the art of communicating thoughts to the mind, through the eye—is the great invention of the world.” Abraham Lincoln’s favorite poetry.
  • Perhaps inevitable but ill-advised: a 50 Shades of Grey book burning. Explains Clare Phillipson, head of the anti-domestic-violence organization Wearside Women in Need, “I do not think I can put into words how vile I think this book is and how dangerous I think the idea is that you get a sophisticated but naive young woman and a much richer, abusive older man who beats her up and does some dreadful things to her sexually.”
  • Just in time for the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Herman Hesse, a film of his time in Ticino.
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    Hale and Hearty

    November 23, 2011 | by

    Among the many things for which I will give thanks this Thursday, foremost is the fact that I am not in charge of Thanksgiving dinner. Instead I’ll be helping my mother in her kitchen, as she helped me in mine last year. It isn’t that I dislike cooking, or even that I feed a real crowd; I cook every day, usually with pleasure, and we don’t pull many extra chairs up to the table for the holiday. But sometime after the second pie has been baked and the turkey is in the oven and half the vegetables are ready but there is still so much to make, and the table not even set, I just want to sneak away without finishing up.

    How great a disappointment I would have been to Sarah Josepha Hale, the woman who led the campaign to make Thanksgiving a national holiday. When Hale was thirty-four and the year was 1822, her husband died, leaving her with five children. Did she allow despair to overcome her stout Yankee heart? Never! She supported her family with that reliable moneymaker, poesy, before publishing a best-selling novel, and eventually going on to become the editor of the most influential women’s magazine in America. Read More »

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