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Posts Tagged ‘ABE Books’

In Praise of Bookstore Cats

January 4, 2013 | by

In addition to bringing the world the glory that is the Weird Book Room (plus, of course, the main site itself), AbeBooks curates a gallery of bookstore cats from all over North America. (We imagine international felines are welcome; the current batch just happens to hail from the U. S. and Canada. Certainly the resident orange cat at Paris’s Tea and Tattered Pages is a notable omission!) While a number of the kitties on display have literary names, Booker Fox, of the Book Nook in Mexico, Missouri, seems to be the only one with her own Facebook page, on which she gives literary recommendations. (The Street of the Fishing Cat was a recent pick.)

 

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Oral Sadism and the Vegetarian Personality

January 3, 2013 | by

Selected from AbeBooks’ Weird Book Room.

 

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Teach Your Wife to Be a Widow

November 12, 2012 | by

Selected from the AbeBooks’ Weird Book Room.

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How to Live with an Idiot

September 27, 2012 | by

 

Selected from the AbeBooks’ Weird Book Room.

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English Smocks

August 29, 2012 | by

Selected from the AbeBooks’ Weird Book Room.

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The Most-Wanted Books of 2012

August 23, 2012 | by

  • Madonna’s Sex is the most sought-after out-of-print book on Bookfinder’s 2012 report.
  • And a signed Where the Wild Things Are is the year’s most expensive. A video on it here.
  • Are women underrepresented in poetry criticism? Sina Queyras, Elisa Gabbert, Shanna Compton, Juliana Spahr, Vanessa Place, and Danielle Pafunda tackle the question.
  • “In 1840, the skull of Sir Thomas Browne was removed from the St. Peter Mancroft church, where it had reposed since 1682.” Alexander Nazaryan on the life of the polymath.
  • Where writers are rock stars: author David Mitchell is mobbed in Shanghai.
  • What fun, fearless female will be the voice of the Sex and the Single Girl audiobook?
  • “The true distinction, however, is not between novels and poems, but between poems and storytelling. The novel is a specific but not fixed form of storytelling, in the same way as the romantic lyric, or the sonnet, is a form of poetry.”
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