The Daily

In Case You Missed It

This Week on the Daily

January 11, 2015 | by

Honore_Daumier,_Le_Charivari_-_Advice_to_Subscribers,_1840

Honoré Daumier, Advice to Subscribers, 1840.

Michel Houellebecq defends his controversial new novel, Soumission.

*

How did the future look from the past? Jason Z. Resnikoff sees the sixties and seventies through 2001 and Alien.

*

In the early nineties, Paul Thomas Anderson found an inspirational teacherDavid Foster Wallace.

*

Dan Piepenbring on the demise of R&B groups and the promise of D’Angelo’s new album, Black Messiah.

*

“Being interesting, at a very basic level, is sort of the point of telling a story in the first place.” Thomas Pierce talks to James Yeh.

*

Michael Thomson on The Evil Within, a horror video game that breaks all the rules.

*

Five new paintings by Mamma Andersson.

*

Ben Mauk visits Berlin‘s art book fair.

*

Plus, Sadie Stein on the history of okay; and a poem by the late Stanislaw Baranczak.

NO COMMENTS

This Week on the Daily

December 7, 2014 | by

Snjokoma1891

E. Ravel, from Die Gartenlaube, 1891.

Our new Winter issue is here. Learn more about its cover, which features a photograph from Marc Yankus.

*

“Art isn’t always what—or where—you expect to find it.” Nicole Rudick looks at art ephemera.

*

Walter Benjamin used to write a radio show for children—here he tells a story with thirty brainteasers. (We’ll post the answers on Thursday.)

*

“I think poetry is always one or two poets away from extinction.” Michael Hofmann and Jack Livings talk about poetry, translation, and Vespas.

*

An interview with Julia Wertz about her online comic, Fart Party, now collected in a new book, The Museum of Mistakes. “I’m a real bitch in my work. No one likes a happy-go-lucky character—that’s the character everyone wants to see destroyed.”

*

Twenty-five years after Wild at Heart, Barry Gifford’s novels are still weird on top.

*

Two centuries after the Marquis de Sade, a French exhibition traces his influence

*

Plus, Sadie Stein sees how far a full-page ad in The New York Times goes; and Joseph Conrad thinks the world is plenty mysterious enough as it is, thanks.

NO COMMENTS

This Week on the Daily

November 30, 2014 | by

Max_Slevogt_Francisco_d'Andrade_Zeitung_lesend_1903

Max Slevogt, Der Sänger Francisco d'Andrade, Zeitung lesend, 1903.

I am writing from a place you have never been, / Where the trains don’t run, and planes / Don’t land … ” Remembering Mark Strand.

*

Justin Taylor talks to Shelly Oria about her new book, New York 1 Tel Aviv 0. “What I’m trying to do, not only as a writer but as a human—is challenge this idea of either-or, hang out a bit in the in-between space.”

*

Paul Muldoon rereads his first book of poetry, 1971’s Knowing My Place 

*

… And Alec Soth annotates his monograph Niagara, including new photographs.

*

“You can look at a piece of mine and think that it’s a benign exploration, but I like to think there’s an edge underneath it all in terms of certain commentaries on relationships.” An interview with Gladys Nilsson.

*

Plus, Sadie Stein on Thanksgiving traditionalists, and Simon Rowe’s winning entry from our Windows on the World contest.

NO COMMENTS

This Week on the Daily

November 23, 2014 | by

Georgios_Jakobides_Girl_reading_c1882

Georgios Jakobides, Girl Reading, ca. 1882, oil on canvas.

Never-before-heard recordings of Maya Angelou, Denise Levertov, and Gary Snyder from our ongoing collaboration with 92Y.

*

Why has Italian cinema lost its appeal abroad? Antonio Monda sees a pattern: “The films that speak to a world audience deliver a poetic or extreme image of Italy, or of an ‘Italy,’ that gibes with the image foreigners already have of it.”

*

Lilly Lampe reviews “Teen Paranormal Romance,” a group exhibition inspired by the burgeoning genre of YA lit.

*

Damion Searls hears haiku in the rhythms of American speech.

*

A brief history of insect control: James McWilliams tells the surprisingly fascinating story of how pesticides came to dominate American agriculture.

*

Plus, Sadie Stein on migraines, “the most glamorous of headaches”; some thoughts on vape, the OED’s 2014 Word of the Year; and Duane Hanson’s Security Guard patrols an art gallery in terrifying solitude.

NO COMMENTS

This Week on the Daily

November 9, 2014 | by

Kirchner_-_Davoser_Cafe

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Davoser Café, 1928.

On the twenty-fifth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Jenny Erpenbeck remembers her childhood in East Berlin: “My parents would bring me to the end of Leipziger Strasse, to the area right in front of the Wall … This was where the world came to an end. For a child, what could be better than growing up at the end of the world?”

*

And Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi visits East Berlin’s famous Karl-Marx-Allee, where the Stalinist architecture still reminds of the dreams of another era.

*

“At the Well”: four new paintings by East Germany’s Neo Rauch.

*

Sam Stephenson on the insightful, unconventional approach to biography on display in Tennessee Williams: Notebooks.

*

Why is a penny called a penny? Damion Searls looks at the etymology of our coins.

*

Plus, Sadie Stein looks back at the dark days of her creative-writing workshop and Black Bart the Outlaw Poet strikes again. (“I’ve labored long and hard for bread,/ For honor, and for riches,/ But on my corns too long you’ve tread,/ You fine-haired sons of bitches.”)

NO COMMENTS

This Week on the Daily

November 1, 2014 | by

Carl_Ostersetzer_Wirtshauspolitik

Detail from Carl Ostersetzer, Wirtshauspolitik, 1914, oil on panel.

James McGirk writes from Oklahoma, where plans for a public satanic ritual expose cultural fault-lines and religion seems to permeate every aspect of life. “They want your soul and they’re willing to fight for it.”

*

Preparing for the Day of the Dead, Rex Weiner reports from Casa Dracula, a haunted house for writers on the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

*

Looking at the controversy surrounding The Death of Klinghoffer, Michael Friedman reminds us that grand opera has always been intertwined with the politics of the day.

*

Dwyer Murphy interviews David Gordon: “My protagonists eat a lot of Chinese food and go to a lot of cafés. People tend to have cats in my stories, and the women have long fingers. I have no idea where this stuff comes from. I have no lost love with long fingers.”

*

Now that the World Series is over, Adam Sobsey has a simple request decades in the making: “Let’s get Dock Ellis into the Hall of Fame.”

*

Plus, Sadie Stein looks at the outmoded fun on display in Cupid’s Cyclopedia; what scares the staff of The Paris Review? (Taylor Swift, among other things); and Thackeray’s doodles reveal his macabre side.

NO COMMENTS