The Daily

Contests

Win a Bicycle!

July 9, 2012 | by

My predecessor George Plimpton was known for cycling around New York  before it was either cool or safe (before, some would say, it was sane). And nowadays, we at TPR are still devoted city bikers; our rides can be found chained up and down White Street. So in celebration of the Tour de France—and thanks to the generosity of Hudson Urban Bikes—we, along with Velojoy, are giving away one of Hudson Urban Bikes' Beater Bicycles Roadster. This classic city bike comes in a men’s and a women’s model, both of which may be seen in the diabolical and rather enigmatic illustration below.

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Announcing the Winner of Our Tote Contest!

June 14, 2012 | by

Last night, our kickoff event at the Strand was red-letter. We laughed (at Amy Warren’s masterful channeling of Dorothy Parker), we cried (at Wallace Shawn’s interpretation of Denis Johnson’s “Car-Crash While Hitchhiking”), and we marveled at the winner of our Strand-Paris Review tote-bag design contest (submitted by Houston’s Roque Strew). Did all the free wine have anything to do with these emotional reactions? We prefer to believe it was due to the overwhelming talent!

6 COMMENTS

Tonight! Join Us at the Strand

June 13, 2012 | by

Don’t miss it! Tonight at 7 P.M., join us for the kickoff of our event series at the Strand, where (in addition to enjoying performances, mingling, and wine) we’ll announce the finalists of our tote-bag contest.

To celebrate our collaboration, we asked you to submit designs for our newest tote bag. And did you deliver! Below, find a few of our favorites! (Thanks, everyone!)

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Tote Contest: Now Extended!

June 1, 2012 | by

As readers of this space will recall, we’ve put out an open call: our next tote bag, a collaboration with the Strand Bookstore, will be designed by … you!

And due to overwhelming demand, we’re extending the deadline by a week. The deadline is now: Friday, June 8.

Get in touch with your inner graphic designer/illustrator and design a tote bag that features the original Paris Review logo (as seen on our homepage and the cover of the magazine) and remember to leave room for the Strand oval, too. You can incorporate old cover art, go all graphic, or dream up something completely your own. (For further inspiration, check out our current totes!) We want to know what the Review means to you!

  • Submission deadline: Friday, June 8, 2012
  • Find both logos here
  • Artwork maximum size: 10 inches by 10 inches
  • EPS vector format preferred; 300 dpi acceptable
  • Send your entry to contests@theparisreview.org
  • The winning design will be revealed at the inaugural event at the Strand on June 13, 2012.

    Top entries will be posted on the Paris Review Daily. The grand-prize winner will receive a Strand shopping spree and a year subscription to The Paris Review. Plus, of course, your tote.

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    Our New Tote, Designed By … You!

    May 14, 2012 | by

    It has long been a source of chagrin here at 62 White (and to George Plimpton before us) that our love for the Strand went unrequited.

    Though we whiled away our weekends amid their shelves, brought them armloads of books every time we moved, and always spent more than we got paid, the Strand refused to carry so much as a single copy of The Paris Review. We tried not to take it personally. We were told it was company policy—no magazines. But in our heart of hearts, we always knew we should be together. Was there no room for us in their sixteen miles of books?

    Now, all is right with the world. Starting June 13, not only can you purchase America’s finest literary quarterly at 13th and Broadway, but you can join us there, too, for a series of events featuring the best fiction, poetry, movies, actors, and readers we can find. It’ll be smart. It’ll be fun. And it will come with an original tote bag celebrating these two venerable New York institutions.

    And who, you ask, will design this tote? You, dear reader! That’s right: we're holding a contest. Get in touch with your inner graphic designer/illustrator. Here are the details:

    Design a bag that features the original Paris Review logo (as seen on our homepage and the cover of the magazine) and remember to leave room for the Strand oval, too. You can incorporate old cover art, go all-graphic, or dream up something completely your own. (For further inspiration, check out our current totes!) We want to know what the Review means to you!

  • Submission deadline: Monday, June 5, 2012
  • Artwork maximum size: 10 inches by 10 inches
  • EPS vector format preferred; 300 dpi acceptable
  • Send your entry to contests@theparisreview.org
  • The winning design will be revealed at the inaugural event at the Strand on June 13, 2012.

    Top entries will be posted on The Paris Review Daily. The grand-prize winner will receive a Strand shopping spree and a year subscription to The Paris Review. Plus, of course, your tote.

  • 7 COMMENTS

    Ladies, Gentlemen, and Bears: We Have a Winner!

    May 10, 2012 | by

    All contributors to our John Irving hypothetical-jacket-copy contest: Bravo! We asked you to incorporate the recurring themes of Irving’s oeuvre into a few sentences, and you ran with it. We laughed, we cried, we cringed. This was not an easy decision. But there was one entry that stood out. And that entry was the work of one Fer O’Neil. The winning entry:

    Phillip is a forty-two-year-old virgin who believes that he would become a sex-addicted pedophile once he experienced his first sexual sensation. Hating himself for that slippery slope, he devotes his life to helping restore nineteenth-century houses as an antique bullion maker. Working on the Hilton Road house south of Augusta, Maine, Philip befriends the abused daughter of his employer. Forced to flee by duty of circumstance, for the next twenty years they live together an unlikely life. Can the dysfunctions that debilitate be the very things that save us? Or are the centrifugal forces that bind us together ultimately what will tear us apart?

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