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Lorrie Moore on Alice Munro

October 10, 2013 | by

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“Well, I have no relationship to her. I’ve never met her. And as for her work, I came to it too late probably for it even to have been an influence, which fills me with despair. I am merely a big fan. She is a great artist, alive and among us, and still writing as well as she did at the start—if not better, which is really saying something, since if you look again at Lives of Girls and Women, her first book, you will see it is a masterpiece, not like any other first book I can think of offhand. (You will also find in it many of the elements of Love of a Good Woman and other later fiction—the obsession with drowning, the allure and menace of men, the erotic moment as narrative pivot and the glimpses of wickedness that only the young are able to act upon to save themselves; the middle-aged must attempt to endure, make do, compromised and complicitous, with what they know.) Her later fiction is quite bold structurally—its handling of time is fearless and satisfying and not to be imitated. She seems over and over again to be writing a kind of ghost story. She is also witty and cruel (that is, unblinking) and painterly. Although she writes of the provinces, she is the least provincial writer I can think of. I’m not sure that this is always understood about her.” —Lorrie Moore, the Art of Fiction No. 167

 

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  1. […] de Man Booker Prize International in 2009. Ze werd geprezen door grootheden als Jonathan Franzen en Lorrie Moore en wordt beschouwd als een van de meest  vooraanstaande schrijvers van kortverhalen. Haar The […]

  2. […] because her stories are set in small towns Consider verbally plagiarizing author Lorrie Moore’s characterization of Munro as a “witty and cruel (that is, unblinking) and painterly” writer who “seems over and over […]

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